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Math » Massachusetts Math Frameworks for Grade 3

Massachusetts Math Frameworks for Grade 3

 Massachusetts Grade 3 Math Standards

(PDF printable version at the bottom of the page)

Continue to address the grades PreK-2 standards as needed.

Number Sense and Operations Strand

Students engage in problem solving, communicating, reasoning, connecting, and representing as they:

3.N.1 Exhibit an understanding of the values of the digits in the base ten number system by reading, modeling, writing, comparing, and ordering whole numbers through 9,999.

3.N.2 Represent, order, and compare numbers through 9,999. Represent numbers using expanded notation (e.g., 853 = 8 x 100 + 5 x 10 + 3), and written out in words (e.g., eight hundred fifty-three).

3.N.3 Identify and represent fractions (between 0 and 1 with denominators through 10) as parts of unit wholes and parts of groups. Model and represent a mixed number (with denominator 2, 3, or 4) as a whole number and a fraction, e.g., 1 2/3, 3 1/2.

3.N.4 Locate on the number line and compare fractions (between 0 and 1 with denominators 2, 3, or 4, e.g., 2/3).

3.N.5 Recognize classes to which a number may belong (odd numbers, even numbers, and multiples of numbers through 10). Identify the numbers in those classes, e.g., the class of multiples of 7 between 1 and 29 consists of 7, 14, 21, 28.

3.N.6 Select, use, and explain various meanings and models of multiplication (through 10 x 10). Relate multiplication problems to corresponding division problems, e.g., draw a model to represent 5 x 6 and 30 ÷ 6.

3.N.7 Use the commutative (order) and identity properties of addition and multiplication on whole numbers in computations and problem situations, e.g., 3 + 4 + 7 = 3 + 7 + 4 = 10 + 4.

3.N.8 Select and use appropriate operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division) to solve problems, including those involving money.
This standard is intentionally the same as standard 4.N.10.

3.N.9 Know multiplication facts through 10 x 10 and related division facts, e.g., 9 x 8 = 72 and 72 ÷ 9 = 8. Use these facts to solve related problems, e.g., 3 x 5 is related to 3 x 50.

3.N.10 Add and subtract (up to four-digit numbers) and multiply (up to two-digit numbers by a one-digit number) accurately and efficiently.

3.N.11 Round whole numbers through 1,000 to the nearest 10, 100, and 1,000.

3.N.12 Understand and use the strategies of rounding and regrouping to estimate quantities, measures, and the results of whole-number computations (addition, subtraction, and multiplication) up to two-digit whole numbers and amounts of money to $100, and to judge the reasonableness of the answer.

3.N.13 Use concrete objects and visual models to add and subtract (only when the answer is greater than or equal to zero) common fractions (halves, thirds, fourths, sixths, and eighths) with like denominators.

Patterns, Relations, and Algebra Strand

Students engage in problem solving, communicating, reasoning, connecting, and representing as they:

3.P.1 Create, describe, extend, and explain symbolic (geometric) patterns and addition and subtraction patterns, e.g., 2, 6, 10, …; and 50, 45, 40.…

3.P.2 Determine which symbol (<, >, or =) is appropriate for a given number sentence, e.g., 7 x 8 .?. 49 + 6.

3.P.3 Determine the value of a variable (through 10) in simple equations involving addition, subtraction, or multiplication, e.g., 2 + o = 9; 5 x [insert upside down capital delta here] = 35.

3.P.4 Write number sentences using +, –, x, ÷, <, =, and/or > to represent mathematical relationships in everyday situations.

Geometry Strand

Students engage in problem solving, communicating, reasoning, connecting, and representing as they:

3.G.1 Compare and analyze attributes and other features (e.g., number of sides, corners, diagonals, and lines of symmetry) of two-dimensional geometric shapes.

3.G.2 Describe, model, draw, compare, and classify two-dimensional shapes, e.g., circles, triangles, and quadrilaterals. Identify and describe simple three-dimensional shapes, e.g., cubes, spheres, and pyramids.

3.G.3 Identify angles as right angles, less than a right angle, and greater than a right angle.

3.G.4 Identify and draw parallel lines, perpendicular lines, and other intersecting lines.

3.G.5 Using ordered pairs of whole numbers and/or letters, locate and identify points on a grid.

3.G.6 Identify and draw lines of symmetry in two-dimensional shapes.

3.G.7 Predict and explain the results of taking apart and combining two-dimensional shapes.

Measurement Strand

Students engage in problem solving, communicating, reasoning, connecting, and representing as they:

3.M.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the attributes length, area, and weight, and select the appropriate type of unit for measuring each attribute using both the U.S. Customary (English) and metric systems.

3.M.2 Carry out simple unit conversions within a system of measurement, e.g., hours to minutes, cents to dollars, yards to feet or inches, etc.
This standard is intentionally the same as standard 4.M.2.

3.M.3 Identify time to the minute on analog and digital clocks using a.m. and p.m. Compute elapsed time, using a clock for times less than one hour (i.e., minutes since), and using a calendar (e.g., days since).

3.M.4 Estimate and find area and perimeter of a rectangle, using diagrams and grids, or by measuring.

3.M.5 Identify and use appropriate metric and U.S. Customary (English) units and tools (e.g., ruler, scale, thermometer, clock) to estimate, measure, and solve problems involving length, area, weight, temperature, and time.

Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability Strand

Students engage in problem solving, communicating, reasoning, connecting, and representing as they:

3.D.1 Collect and organize data using observations, measurements, surveys, or experiments, and identify appropriate ways to display the data.
This standard is intentionally the same as standard 4.D.1.

3.D.2 Match representations of a data set in the forms of tables, line plots, pictographs, tallies, or bar graphs with the actual data set.

3.D.3 Construct and draw conclusions from representations of data sets in the forms of tables, line plots, pictographs, tallies, and bar graphs.

3.D.4 List and count the number of possible combinations of objects from two sets, e.g., how many different outfits can one make from a set of two sweaters and a set of three skirts?



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