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Buttonwood Park Zoo

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Elephants are the world’s largest land animals, surpassed in size only by the larger species of whales.

There are two existing elephant species, the African and Asian. The Buttonwood Park Zoo has two female Asian elephants, Emily and Ruth. The Asian is the smaller of the two species.

Physical Characteristics

The Asian elephant has a massive gray body, a huge domed head with rather small ears, and the well-known, distinctive trunk and tusks.

Its legs are massive pillars, required to support its great body weight, and its short, broad feet are equipped with nails and an elastic pad. The Asian elephant has five toes on its front feet and four on its back feet. Elephants walk on their toes and use their ears to cool themselves because they do not sweat.

If you want to look more closely, you will see a single protuberance, much like a finger, at the tip of the trunk. The African elephant has two such “fingers.”

A large bull elephant may stand as high as 10 feet at the shoulders and weigh as much as six tons. The female of the species is noticeably smaller, with a typical weight of about 2 1/2 to 3 tons.

Food and Diet

Elephants eat a great variety of plants, including grasses, tree bark, and leaves. In a typical day, an Asian elephant eats about 5 percent of its body weight and drinks nearly 50 gallons of water.

In the course of feeding, elephants uproot trees with their trunks, tear off branches, and use their tusks to strip bark from trees.

This apparently destructive behavior actually has many ecological benefits. Smaller animals eat the debris left behind by elephants, and birds can feast on insects and small reptiles turned up by the elephant’s feeding.

The broad swath created by an elephant as it travels through forest or grasslands in search of food act as conduits for rainwater and natural firebreaks.

During dry periods, elephants dig water holes in dry riverbeds, creating new sources of water. And the deep footprints they leave behind trap rainfall that can be drunk by smaller creatures.

Life Cycle

A female elephant, known as a cow, usually begins mating at the age of 13 or 14. An Asian elephant’s pregnancy lasts between 22-24 months, the longest of all mammals.

The elephant calf weighs between 165-225 pounds. Normally, only one calf is born, but in rare cases there are twins. The mother nurses the calf for several years. A cow can produce offspring until she’s about 50 years old. Births are usually spaced anywhere from 2 1/2 to 4 years apart, but if food is scarce the spacing is longer.

A young elephant grows very rapidly until it’s about 15 years old, when growth slows down.

Females and young elephants stay together in a matriarchal herd. As male elephants reach adolescence, between 8 and 13 years of age, they begin to spend more time outside the matriarchal herd, gradually joining a group of males known as a bachelor herd.

The matriarchal herd is usually led by an older, wise cow who guides the younger animals to the best feeding and watering spots.

Matriarchal and bachelor herds travel separately, with the males covering a much larger area than the females. As a male grows older, he usually leaves the bachelor herd and begins to range alone, rejoining the females only to mate.

Elephants have very large, strong molars, which are used to chew tree branches and roots. When a molar wears away, it’s replaced by another. This happens four times during an elephant’s life. When its last molars have worn away, an old elephant can no longer chew its food and will probably starve to death.

The typical life span of an elephant in the wild is about 70 years, possibly more. In captivity, elephants have lived to be 80 years old.

Trunks, Tusks, & Brains

An elephant’s trunk is extremely versatile. It can lift objects weighing hundreds of pounds and objects as small as a coin and can hold over two gallons of water. It functions as a hand, nose, and drinking straw. The elephant’s trunk is actually a merger of its nose and upper lip. It’s both a heavy-duty tool and a very sensitive organ that contains more than 100,000 muscle units.

An elephant can use its trunk to uproot trees or to manipulate very small objects. It’s also used to carry food and water to the mouth and, in hot weather, the elephant sprays itself with cooling water or dust from the trunk.

In addition, the trunk functions as a trumpet that can send sounds over long distances, allowing elephants to communicate with one another.

Male Asian elephants grow large tusks, which are really overgrown incisors that protrude well out of the mouth. Female Asian elephants may grow small tuskes called “tushes,” which usually stick out just past the upper lip, though they’re longer than that in some females.

Elephants have long been popular in circuses and zoos not just because of their size and appearance, but also because of the intelligence that allows them to learn and perform a large variety of tricks.

Their intelligence has also made elephants valuable working animals, especially in Asian logging camps, where they’ve been employed for more than a thousand years.

Working as loggers, elephants learned to respond to hundreds of verbal commands and to use their strength stripping trees and moving logs from place to place.

When the Buttonwood Park Zoo was closed for renovation, our elephants were retrained to perform many of those tasks. Elephant Country, where they now live, has been redesigned to simulate an Indian logging camp, where they demonstrate their new skills every day.

Have you heard the great news?

 The Zoo and the City have put together a plan to enhance the Asian Elephant Habitat. This funding will allow the zoo to approximately triple its current elephant habitat space, enhance the elephant barn, install more safety features, provide access to outdoor heated areas, provide better opportunity to educate zoo guests on the conservation of elephants, and create an overall more stimulating environment for New Bedford's favorite residents, Emily and Ruth.


Some residents have raised a concern that the enhanced habitat will involve expansion into Buttonwood Park. All enhancements, including increasing the size of the elephant habitat, will occur within the current footprint of the zoo and will not involve any additional park space.  

 

 The Buttonwood Park Zoo prides itself on providing the highest quality of care to every animal residing at the zoo, including Emily and Ruth. A recent inspection by elephant experts from the Association of Zoos and Aquariums noted how well the zoo cares for its elephant and that the elephants were in apparent very good health despite their advanced age. The enhancement of the elephant habitat at the zoo will allow us to provide even better care for Emily and Ruth in their golden years.


Please feel free to let the New Bedford City Council know that you support the zoo's efforts to enhance the habitat for Emily and Ruth.

 

Please read the article "Mayor Seeks $43 Million Capital Improvement Program" featured in today's Standard Times for more information. 

 

 

Sincerely, 

 

Keith Lovett 

Director of Zoological Services 
Buttonwood Park Zoo

Tips for a Great Zoo Visit!
  • Please note that during warm weather, the animals are more active in the mornings when it is cooler. May we suggest an early start for your visit?  We open at 9:00 AM.


  • If you arrive at the Zoo later in the day, you may wish to go to the Elephant Exhibit first to assure you have a chance to see Emily and Ruth before they go inside for the evening.


  • Please keep in mind that the Zoo is very busy toward the end of the school year (especially in the month of May) as schools take their field trips to the Zoo during weekdays. You may wish to plan for a weekend visit during this time.


  • If you have small children, you should check out the Toe Jam Puppet Band which performs every Monday (outside, weather permitting, otherwise held inside).  The cost is $5.00 per family plus zoo admission.


  • The best time for food service on Mondays is a half-hour before and during the Toe Jam Puppet Band shows. The Bear’s Den Cafe tends to become crowded right after the performance.


  • During really hot weather, the Zoo has misting stations for visitors at the Mt. Lion Exhibit and Domestic Barn.  Please take advantage of these opportunities to cool off!







Betsey B. Winslow School
New Bedford
561 Allen Street
New Bedford, MA 02740